The Catholic University of America

Timothy B. Noone

Professor of Philosophy

 
Email: noonet@cua.edu

OfficeAquinas Hall 217
Phone: (202) 319-6646
Office hours: Spring 2012: on leave
Mailing address:

The Catholic University of America
School of Philosophy
Washington, DC 20064, USA

Education

Ph.D., University of Toronto, 1988
M.S.L., Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1987

Areas of Interest

Medieval Metaphysics and Epistemology, Franciscan Philosophy, Philosophy of History

Curriculum vitae Song featuring Duns Scotus


Select Publications

Of Angels and Men: Sketches from High Medieval Epistemology. The Etienne Gilson Series 34. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies Publications, 2011.    
John Duns Scotus, Quaestiones super secundum et tertium De anima. Edited by Timothy B. Noone et al. Opera philosophica 5. Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press; St. Bonaventure, N.Y.: The Franciscan Institute Publications, 2006.    
A Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages, edited by Jorge J. E. Gracia and Timothy B. Noone. Oxford: Blackwell, 2003. Paperback edition 2005.    
“Saint Bonaventure and Angelic Natural Knowledge of Singulars: A Source for the Doctrine of Intuitive Cognition?” American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (2011): 143–59. 

“Scotus on Mind and Being: Transcendental and Developmental Psychology.” Acta Philosophica 18 (2009): 249–82.

“Ascoli, Wylton, and Alnwick on Scotus’s Formal Distinction: Taxonomy, Refinement, and Interaction.” In Philosophical Debates at Paris in the Early Fourteenth Century, edited by Stephen F. Brown, Thomas Dewender, and Theo Kobusch, 127–49. Studien und Texte zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters 102. Leiden: Brill, 2009.

Noone, Timothy B., and H. Francie Roberts. “John Duns Scotus’ Quodlibet.” In Theological Quodlibeta in the Middle Ages: The Fourteenth Century, edited by Christopher Schabel, 131–98. Leiden: Brill, 2007.

“Universals and Individuation.” In The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus, edited by Thomas Williams, 100–28. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.